The sealing of a criminal record means that the public, including private employers, will not be able to view it. Government agencies, however, will still have access to it. The expungement of a criminal record means that not even a government agency will be able to see the record without a court order. Either way, you generally won’t be required to disclose your arrest. In the state of Florida, there are specific circumstances under which you can have your criminal record sealed or expunged, depending on whether or not you were convicted of a crime.

If you were arrested, but not convicted of a crime, then your criminal record may qualify for sealing or expungement. However, you cannot have had a criminal record sealed or expunged in the past, even from another state. You also may not have a pending petition to seal or expunge a criminal record.

If you were convicted of a crime, or pleaded no contest, there is an extensive list of crimes that are not eligible under Florida law for sealing or expungement. If you were convicted of any felony crime, or convicted of DUI, you will not qualify for record sealing or expungement.

In order to file for expungement, you have to obtain a certificate of eligibility. The rules for sealing or expunging a criminal record are complicated. If you think you may qualify for record sealing or expungement, you need to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. A. Randall Haas is an aggressive South Florida criminal defense lawyer, with over 29 years experience in Florida courts. A criminal record can seriously impact your future. Contact criminal record expungement attorney A. Randall Haas for assistance in having your record sealed or expunged.